FOOD TECHNOLOGY

Translating Food Technology: Social media panic of the month scrambles the egg picture

Social media scrambles egg advice

Because the Internet, social media and e-mail chain letters have become important sources of information for grocery shoppers, Farmer Goes to Market regularly follows those sources for food news and food-safety warnings. We will bring you regular updates on such food-news reports, testing them for accuracy and context, so you can convey the realities to your consumers.

This month, like our previous report on Facebook claims about dangers of chlorine in baby carrots, another long-lived Internet-driven theme claims scrambling eggs is the next big danger. Because scrambling an egg breaks its yolk and therefore allows the cooking heat to oxidize the natural cholesterol found in it, according to these Internet health experts, scrambling is the most risky form of egg preparation—riskier even, it seems, than eating them raw. Oxidizing the egg yolks increases the level of very low density lipoproteins in the cholesterol, which is the form of cholesterol most linked to coronary disease. Accordingly, the ranking of dangerous egg cooking practices, from least to most, goes like this:

  • Raw, if pastured and organic
  • Soft boiled or poached with runny yolk
  • Fried in butter or coconut oil, sunny side up, soft yolk
  • Cooking with the yolk intact
  • Cooking with a broken yolk
  • Scrambled or omelet

It's a very elegant scientific theory, save for one small problem. "Not only is this ranking silly," says molecular biologist and senior fellow for the American Council on Science and Health Julianna LeMieux, "it's dead wrong."

Here's why:

This theory that never dies completely dismisses an important fact about cholestrol and nutrition. Yes, eggs contain cholesterol. And yes, whipping the yolk and heating oxidizes it, converting more of the cholesterol into the VLDL form. The problem is the lipid profile of the cholesterol is irrelevent, because it never reaches the bloodstream in the form it's consumed. All cholesterol, regardless of its form, only gets converted into VLDL (the worst form), low density lipoprotein (bad), or high density lipoprotein (good cholesterol) after it's digested and reaches the liver. How the liver converts those components into VLDL, LDL or HDL and then sends them into the bloodstream is genetically determined and affected only peripherally by diet and exercise. That's why, for most people, the cholesterol you get from your diet makes little to no difference in HDL or LDL levels.

The real irony of the Internet advice, LeMieux argues, is that the only real risk in eating eggs comes with the "best" alternative in the list above: eating raw eggs.

Eating eggs raw does bring a chance, although small, of causing harm. In about one in 20,000 times, she says, eggs can carry Salmonella bacteria which can cause a stomach bug. And that risk is the same whether the eggs are organic or not. So if they're playing the odds, cooking, regardless of how consumers choose to do so, is a safer bet than eating eggs raw.

Have an Internet myth or consumer concern relayed to you that you'd like to see us address? Leave a comment below, or click here to email us.

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