FOOD POLITICS

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Monday December 11, 2017

No pesticide is safe any more?

USDA’s latest Pesticide Data Program report on samples collected in 2014 found, again, that America’s food supply is safe, showing pesticide residues well below even the more sensitive levels that could pose health risk for infants and children. However, the news that pesticide residue levels were at or below EPA-deemed safe levels in all but 38 out of 10,619 fresh fruit and vegetable, baby food, salmon, oat and rice samples tested was not reassuring to anti-technology advocates like the U.S. Right to Know coalition.

That group and others questioned why USDA doesn’t test fresh produce for all pesticides, in particular glyphosate, the broad-spectrum weed killer whose use has gone up since row crops were genetically modified to resist its action. USDA argues because glyphosate isn’t widely used in fresh produce, there’s no good reason to go to the expense of testing for it in those particular foodstuffs covered by the USDA report.

True to form, the Environmental Working Group joined the criticism of glyphosate in early February, claiming increased use of the pesticide and increases in allowable levels of residues by regulators—in response to scientific studies showing those levels are safe—are posing an unacceptable risk to consumers. EWG breathlessly reports the herbicide has showed up in “samples of honey, soy sauce, infant formula and even breast milk.”

But once again, the activist group repeats the same critical error it makes annually in its highly publicized, but logically suspect, “Dirty Dozen” list of the most pesticide-contaminated produce. Its annual report, based on the same USDA data, links pesticide food residue data with toxicological profiles for each chemical. The end result is a litany of common pesticides, most showing up as residues on any of 93 different foods listed, ranging in incidence from none at all to as high as nearly 90 percent.

But in all the alarming facts and figures, EWG fails to enter the most important discussion of all: Are the residues relevant?

Farmer Goes to Market re-analyzed some of EWG’s data on incidence to paint a more accurate picture of the real issue: exposure. We found that in all cases, the amount of produce necessary for adults and children to eat daily, according to the minimum safety standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, are far beyond the physical capability, let alone the desire to do so.

 

Pounds of strawberries eaten per day

 

Pounds of potatoes eaten per day

 

EWG’s repeated habit of equating presence with danger is not only inaccurate, it borders on harmful exploitation if it drives consumers away from the healthy foods they most need.

As water contamination expert Dr. Shane Snyder, research and development project manager for the Southern Nevada Water Authority. told Congress in 2008, "Are we going to make decisions based upon our ability to find contaminants, or based upon protection of public health? I am not a policy-maker; I am a scientist. However, I can tell you with absolute certainty that, if we regulate contaminants based upon detection rather than health effects, we are embarking on a futile journey without end. The reason is simple: Decades ago, we could only detect contaminants at parts per million levels. Years ago, we advanced to parts per billion. We are now able to detect compounds at the parts-per-trillion level, and are breaching the parts-per-quadrillion boundary in some cases."

Although Snyder's testimony was in regard to pharmaceutical residues found in drinking water, the point applies equally to fear-mongering based on pesticide residues in food. If we insist on scaring people from food based simply on our ability to find a trace compound, we risk not only reducing grocery profitability by scaring shoppers from one of the highest-margin areas of the grocery, we are on our way to making meaningful regulation based on realistic risk impossible.

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