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Monday December 11, 2017
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 Reconnecting Nebraska's Farmers and Grocery Retailers

 
Sponsored by your Nebraska Grocery Industry Association

Dear UseThis,

Message from Kathy Siefken, Nebraska Grocery Industry Association
NGIA will hold its Annual Conference and Golf Outing on June 11 and 12 at Tiburon Golf Club  in Omaha.  The Conference starts with Matt Davison, well known Nebraska athlete, at 1 p.m., followed by a presentation by M.K. Muehling, international trainer and author, on Communication at Work: How to Say What You Mean and Mean What You Say.  The afternoon's workshops will be followed with a barbecue at 5:30 p.m.  On June 12 we begin the day with a 9 a.m. shotgun start at Tiburon.  Perfect weather is on order!  Registration forms and details can be found at www.nebgrocer.com.

 

Sincerely,
Kathy Siefken
Executive Director
Nebraska Grocery Industry Association

 

 
We take great pride in supporting Nebraska's agricultural foundation
The farm and ranch families represented by Nebraska Farm Bureau are proud sponsors of the Farmer Goes to Market program. We take great pride in supporting Nebraska's agricultural foundation. A key part of that effort is to make sure we produce safe and affordable food. This newsletter is an important part of our effort to connect the two most important parts of the food chain -- the farmer and the grocer -- with the goal of increasing consumer awareness and information about how their food is raised in Nebraska.

 

 
An educational program produced by Food-Chain Communications and delivered to members of the Nebraska Grocery Industry Association. Farmer Goes to Market was established in 2008 to help bridge the growing gulf between today's grocery retailer and today's farmer, empowering them with full-chain knowledge to carry agriculture's true message to food consumers.

 

 
Nebraska's soybean farmers are proud to bring you this information to help answer customer questions
Nebraska soybean farmers and their checkoff are proud sponsors of the Farmer Goes to Market program, realizing that this program provides an integral link in the food system chain. The information provided in this newsletter is a key step in our educational initiative, providing consumers with information on our effort to provide them with a safe, affordable, abundant food supply.

 

Navigating the New Food Movement:
Don't Assume Everything You've Heard
about Obesity, Fast Food and Deserts is True
Think you know all about food deserts? True or false?

1. Overworked, time-strapped Americans turn to fast food more often than their counterparts with more free time on their hands.

2. School kids are fatter in "food deserts," areas without an easily accessible grocery store.

3. Bringing groceries back into food deserts translates into higher fruit and vegetable consumption by poor people nearby.

Think you know the answers? A recently published set of consumer demographic studies may surprise you and challenge your assumptions about the important issues of obesity, fast food and food deserts. Click here to see what they showed.

Foresight on Food Politics:
Four Years Later, What Has COOL
Done for You Lately?

What has COOL done for you lately?

Mandatory country of origin labeling, or "COOL," was supposed to increase demand for U.S. products because consumers would appreciate exercising their "right to know." On the occasion of the law's recent fourth anniversary, take a guess how much benefit the retail sector has reaped from the additional cost and trouble the law added. Click here for another teachable moment on the difference between what consumers say they'll pay for vs. what they really do pay for.

 

Competitive Commodity Insight:
Grilling Pre-Season Update
It's a lonely ol' grill, and ain't they all?You should be pleased to know that one estimate now says nine out of 10 American homes own a grill or barbecue. And the long winter has made many of them lonely places. Here's a quick look at the outlook for the common commodities that will be filling those devices soon.

Translating Food Technology:

Can Technology Really Make
the Modern Food System More 'Sustainable?'Can technology save our sustainable souls?

As retailers continue to buy into the "sustainable food" message, farm organizations are responding by arguing that using technology permits more food to be raised using fewer resources. After all, for instance, technology now allows America's beef farmers to basically provide the same amount of beef today using the cow numbers (and environmental impact) of a half century ago. How's that not sustainable?
Here's how, according to some recently released expectations of one famous environmental group.




Meet your Farmers...

For Nebraska Ranchers, it All Comes down to these Months. It's the Make-or-Break Season

Like their grocer partners, Nebraska's farmers face certain crunch periods when an entire year can be made or broken. For instance: Fully seven out of every 10 beef calves in this part of the country are born between February and April. Watch this short interview, as Livingston County rancher Todd Eggerling talks about what he does to tip the odds in his favor.

   

 

Why it all comes down to these few months for Nebraska cattle ranchers  

On the Lighter Side:
The Prank that Launched a Thousand Imitators--the Driverless Drive-through
Impressive, yes. But can he pull it off in a motorized shopping cart in the 20-items-or-less lane?

O-M-G, it's a driverless C-A-R!
Click here for more details on today's Food Morality Movement
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Food-Chain Communications | 233 SW Greenwich Dr | Lee's Summit | MO | 64082

In the past, consumers knew the farmers who grew their food. Separated then typically by only a processor, a wholesaler and a grocer, the consumer easily trusted the simple chain that delivered the food. Today, a complex web of anonymous companies and people inhabit space between the farmer and the consumer. By one estimate, for instance, it now takes 57 companies to make and deliver a can of chicken noodle soup. The result? “ Separation anxiety,” an ever-widening gulf between the consumer and the farmer -- physical, mental and emotional. And anyone sowing seeds of misinformation can find fertile ground in the strained channels of communication along today’s food-chain.

At the end of that chain, grocery retailers -- the only representative many consumers now experience face-to-face contact with -- often find themselves serving as the farmer’s proxy, suddenly responsible for fielding questions from consumers about what that farmer does with our food supply and its potential impact on their health. 

At the other distant end, farmers are left perplexed over how food is marketed and sold to consumers and why supermarkets choose the sometimes confusing product messages they communicate.

If information is not flowing freely between these two stakeholders then the whole food-chain can bear the consequence of a confused or even frightened consumer.

Farmer Goes to Market is designed to shore up this information gap, to provide direct answers to common questions, such as:

  • “Does this milk have hormones in it?
  • “Are the hormones in meat and milk causing our youth to mature faster?”
  • “What does antibiotic-free mean?”
  • “By eating fruits or vegetables am I digesting harmful pesticides?”
  • “Are there any “family farms” left?”
  • “Is biotechnology good for me?”
  • “Are modern-day agriculture practices sustainable?”
  • “Do farmers really take good care of their animals?”
  • “Is all food traceable down to the farmer who produced it?”


Click here (Adobe Acrobat format) to read more about the first Farmer Goes to Market pavilion at the N.G.A. Annual Trade Show and Supermarket Synergy Showcase Inside, where grocers met real life farmers face-to-face to ask the questions your customers ask you. Nowhere else could you see the food-chain coming together so vividly, re-connecting these two powerful food-chain stakeholders, eliminating misinformation and building a continued dialogue for earning consumer trust. 

Now we're coming to Nebraska!

Following a successful pilot program in cooperation with the Missouri Grocers Association, the successful national rollout of Farmer Goes to Market is being rolled out on a state-by-state basis, now coming to Nebraska. Don't miss the value of reading, participating and giving your farmers feedback:

  • Equip yourself to become an indispensable link in the food chain
  • Arm yourself with non-biased information to educate your customers
  • Connect with a ready, continual resource you can immediately turn to when you face future questions regarding farm issues
  • Increase your confidence to answer often quite complex inquiries over today’s food issues

 

Farmer Goes to Market: Real farmers. Real grocers. Real answers

Partners

Supported by the Nebraska Corn Board

The Nebraska Corn Board, on behalf of 23,000 corn farmers in Nebraska, invests in market development, research, promotion and education of corn and value-added products. The board aims to work closely with the farmer-to-consumer food chain, to educate everyone about the role corn has in our everyday healthy lives. The Nebraska Corn Board is proud to sponsor the Farmer Goes to Market program to help bring its mission of expanding demand and value of Nebraska corn to the consumer, through the strongest touch point in that chain: the Nebraska retail grocer.


Supported by the Nebraska Farm Bureau

The farm and ranch families represented by Nebraska Farm Bureau are proud sponsors of the Farmer Goes to Market program. We take great pride in supporting Nebraska's agricultural foundation. A key part of that effort is to make sure we produce safe and affordable food. This newsletter is an important part of our effort to connect the two most important parts of the food chain -- the farmer and the grocer -- with the goal of increasing consumer awareness and information about how their food is raised in Nebraska.


In patnership with the Nebraska Grocery Industry Association

The Nebraska Grocery Industry Association was formed in 1903 by a group of Omaha grocery store owners, wholesalers and vendors to allow them to promote independent food merchants and members of the food industry, and to promote education and cooperation among its membership. NGIA continues to represent grocery store owners and operators, along with wholesalers and vendors located throughout Nebraska, by promoting their success through proactive government relations, innovative solutions and quality services. NGIA offers efficient and economical programs. NGIA also lobbies on both a state and national level, ensuring that the voice of the food industry in Nebraska is heard by our representatives.


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